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The protests are actively blocking the nomination of leaders

12 July 2013 / 21:07:07  GRReporter
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Anastasia Balezdrova

Theatre and film director Javor Gardev is one of the most distinguished Bulgarian authors. He is the author of numerous productions, including theatre performances, interdisciplinary projects such as video and art performances, radio plays and a film which was awarded the "Silver St. George" prize for staging at the 30th edition of the festival in Moscow. The director has won many national and international awards, including the Berliner Grand Prix Europe for Best European Radio Drama for "The Atoll" in 1999.

Javor Gardev supports and participates in the protests that followed the appointment of Delian Peevski as the head of the State Agency for National Security and have been going on for 29 days already. He analyzes the events and presents his view on them in an interview for GRReporter.

How would you comment on the fact that the recent situation in Bulgaria has become the subject of discussion in the European Parliament?

The European Union is, to some extent, a united body already, although it is not yet homogeneous and is still forming. Therefore, when there is a problem in any part of the body, it is normal for the head to show interest in it. It is completely logical for such a debate to be triggered when there is unrest. The question is how this debate in the European Parliament may make clear to the Members of the European Parliament the situation in Bulgaria. Bulgaria has many internal political characteristics that are absolutely impervious to an outsider and which are based more on domestic relations and interests within the country itself rather than on any political principles. That is why it is difficult to explain the development to these people and it is difficult for them to understand the events.

The European Green Party has differentiated itself from the Party of European Socialists which it usually supports. What do you think has caused this?

This is not a surprise to me. Each party reacts in its own way to specific political issues. This is the normal democratic practice and it is not necessary to expect that the Green Party will support the Socialists in each case. It is obvious that it agrees with some policies but we cannot expect this regarding others. In this sense, I suppose that it has sided with the Green Party of Bulgaria. It is not represented in the Bulgarian Parliament and the fact that it would form a coalition with the leftist government in Bulgaria is not self-evident. The Green Party of Bulgaria is a special case. Of course, it is a left-wing party and it is facing the question of whether it will enter the Reformist Bloc and how. I think that there is an internal debate in the party. I am not following it but it is logical to think that, as a progressive party and a party of activists with a specific cause, this will be a party with a proper position. I do not know whether it will reach a stable agreement with the right-wing parties in the Reformist Bloc but I hope that this will happen. The aim is publicly important and worthwhile.

You state in a recent interview that you voted for the Green Party of Bulgaria. How did it attract you?

What attracted me to support it in the last elections, although I had not traditionally voted for it so far, was that I read its programme and found there quite reasonable things, especially in the area of ​​tax policy. It offers a very reasonable taxation which is allocated in accordance with income and is a stimulating factor for both the middle class and poorer. It offers fair taxation of the rich and no taxation to a certain minimum for the poor. It seems a reasonable tax policy for Bulgaria. Of course, I support the main cause of the Green Party of Bulgaria which seems to be outside the scope of the right and left wings. Naturally, some of its causes are associated with left policies but they are reasonable and progressive.

Do you think that the formation of this reformist block will succeed?

The situation is very complex because a new urban political subject is actually being established. It represents a specific urban class that seeks to differentiate its political representation and to have a considerable influence in Bulgarian politics. Whoever fails to articulate the demands and political intuitions of this new subject most precisely would be an important factor in the next parliament.

Yes, I do. I even think that it should have been set up a lot faster. I also think that, in a sense, the Bulgarian politicians have been unable to respond to the political moment and this affects all areas of the political spectrum. They have been unable to realize what is happening. Only the Reformist Bloc is trying to mature in order for its identity to respond to the processes. Its attempt to emerge is something similar. I am really interested to see what will happen in this area. In the other areas, I see replication of decayed and outdated comments on what is happening in the country and interpretations by using obsolete terminology. No explanatory findings are being offered to satisfy the requirements of the moment. The situation is very complex because a new urban political subject is actually being established. It represents a specific urban strata that seeks to differentiate its political representation and to have a considerable influence in Bulgarian politics. Whoever fails to articulate the demands and political intuitions of this new subject most precisely would be an important factor in the next parliament.

Tags: PoliticsProtestUrban classLeadersJavor GardevReformist BlocGreen Party
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